Two interesting links

Cora Buhlert, “On Internet Debates and the Tone Argument”:

Besides, reasoned calls for civility and comparing internet uproars to Orwellian “two-minute hate” sessions both fail to ask an important question, namely why there are so many heated debates in fandom and why they seem to be circling eternally around the same few subjects.

E. Catherine Tobler, “The Women We Don’t See”:

Could a reader not realize they hadn’t read a female author in two years? Unfortunately, I believe the answer is absolutely and completely yes, because male authors remain the default. Readers just go there, without thinking twice.

Hugo Award Nominations 2014. Part IV.

I’m attending the 2014 Worldcon, and that means I get to nominate for the Hugo Awards. And, because I’m the kind of shy retiring flower who hesitates to share her opinions, I’m going to tell you all about my nominations!

But I’ll do it in more than one blogpost, because the Hugo Awards have a lot of categories. And one may nominate up to five items in each category.

First post here. Second post here.

Now, let’s talk about the final category: Best Novel.

The sheer size of the field means it’s impossible for any single person to read every novel published in it, much less every novel and a good proportion of the short work, and the related work, and grasp at least some of the art – rather like Jonathan McCalmont and Martin Lewis and Ian Sales, I’m pretty convinced the Hugo Award has too many categories. (But we run with the award we have, not the one we wish we had.)

So when it comes to the novels I read that were published in 2013, let’s not pretend it isn’t a more limited field than the field as a whole. And while I’m going to be picking the best of that, let’s not pretend that technically-best isn’t going to be playing up against favourite-things-best.

So, caveats aside, what novels did I find best of 2013?

Ann Leckie’s ANCILLARY JUSTICE tops the list. A debut novel, it is polished, powerful, doing interesting things with space opera, and kicked me in all the narrative squids.

Elizabeth Bear’s SHATTERED PILLARS comes second. It is an incredibly well-written book, and I really think its predecessor, Range of Ghosts, should have made more award lists last year.

Marie Brennan’s A NATURAL HISTORY OF DRAGONS is also on the list. I really like the world, the voice, and the narrative conceit of it, even if the pacing can be up-and-down.

Nicola Griffith’s HILD. I don’t care if it is fantasy, magical realism, or “merely” straight historical fiction. It is ON THIS LIST, because it belongs here.

I am torn over fifth place on the list. Nalo Hopkinson’s SISTER MINE? Roz Kaveney’s REFLECTIONS? Something else I haven’t got to read yet? Feel free to convince me in comments.

Hugo Award Nominations 2014. Part III.

I’m attending the 2014 Worldcon, and that means I get to nominate for the Hugo Awards. And, because I’m the kind of shy retiring flower who hesitates to share her opinions, I’m going to tell you all about my nominations!

But I’ll do it in more than one blogpost, because the Hugo Awards have a lot of categories. And one may nominate up to five items in each category.

First post here. Second post here.

Now, let’s talk about:

Best Novella (17,500 to 40,000 words)

Best Novelette (7,500 to 17,500 words)

Best Short Story (up to 7,500 words)

Best Related Work

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer (Not A Hugo)


Best Novella

Elizabeth Bear, Book of Iron, Subterranean Press
Beth Bernobich, “Thief of War,” Tor.com
Greer Gilman, Cry Murder! In a Small Voice.

Again, I haven’t read widely in this category. I liked these novellas, but I am far from certain that if I’d read more widely I wouldn’t have different opinions.

Best Novelette (7,500 to 17,500 words)

Don’t know. Won’t nominate.

Best Short Story (up to 7,500 words)

Benjanun Sriduangkaew, “Silent Bridge, Pale Cascade”, Clarkesworld.

Again, I haven’t read widely enough. I was blown away by this short story, but I only read it because everyone, practically, linked me to it.

Best Related Work

“‘We Have Always Fought’: Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative,” by Kameron Hurley, at A Dribble of Ink.

“Gender Parity and Cover Art,” by Justin Landon, at The Book Smugglers.

Steeleye Span, Wintersmith, album.

Kathryn Allen, ed., Disability in Science Fiction.

Here, again, I haven’t read widely enough to nominate a stronger slate.

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer (Not a Hugo)

Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead and Two Serpent Rise.

Django Wexler, author of The Thousand Names.

Benjanun Sriduangkaew, whose short fiction is appearing all over the place and is, from what I can see, very damn good.

Sofia Samatar, whose work I do not personally like but which is, nonetheless, very good.

I’m open to persuasion as to slot #5, but I don’t think I’m going to find another writer I really want to nominate this year.

Hugo Nominations 2014. Part II.

I’m attending the 2014 Worldcon, and that means I get to nominate for the Hugo Awards. And, because I’m the kind of shy retiring flower who hesitates to share her opinions, I’m going to tell you all about my nominations!

But I’ll do it in more than one blogpost, because the Hugo Awards have a lot of categories. And one may nominate up to five items in each category.

First post here.

Now, let’s talk about:

Best Semiprozine

Best Fanzine

Best Fancast

Best Graphic Story

…Although this time I won’t spend a lot of time explaining my choices.


Best Semiprozine

Strange Horizons

Tor.com

Beneath Ceaseless Skies

Clarkesworld

I haven’t read anything else enough to feel like nominating it, and I’m not even completely certain I should be nominating in this category, since I haven’t read widely enough.

Best Fanzine

Pornokitsch

The Book Smugglers

A Dribble of Ink

Again, I don’t think I’ve read enough, and I don’t feel certain enough of this category to want to nominate other things. (I almost feel like nominating Martin Lewis‘s and Jonathan McCalmont‘s blogs, but… maybe not.)

Best Fancast

I haven’t listened to a single podcast in months. I don’t have time. So I won’t be nominating in this category.

Best Graphic Story

With the exception of Gail Simone’s Batgirl, I haven’t read anything eligible for this category, and thus won’t be nominating.