“You look different when you tell the truth. Your eyes change.” ATOMIC BLONDE (2017) – Patreon

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It is August 2017. I’m tired and overwhelmed by world events (the USA, Iraq, Finland, Malaysia, Catalonia, and of course Australia’s wonderful idea to hold a marriage equality plebiscite), local events, and how much work I have to do in order to get paid.

This is not a review of the news, though, but of Atomic Blonde, the film I went to see in order to distract myself from all of that.

Based on the graphic novel The Coldest City by Sam Hart and Anthony Johnston, directed by David Leitch (in his first feature-length film), and starring Charlize Theron, Atomic Blonde is a spy film set in 1989 Berlin. Claustrophobic, stylish, rooted in its time and place, Atomic Blonde reminded me a little bit of The Sandbaggers, a little bit of The Bourne Identity, and a lot of Greg Rucka’s spy novels and graphic novels (some of which, come to think of it, were published by the same outfit as The Coldest City).

The cinematography is excellent. There’s a recurring motif of shots through doors and windows, of shots in reflections, of mirrors, of things seen at an angle or edgewise-on. Everything is angles, everything is deceptive, nothing you see can be taken at face value. The characters are all angles and smooth surfaces, frictionless except where they’re playing it rough: everything is nested betrayals and triple-crosses.

Theron plays spy/agent Lorraine Broughton with a chill like the ice-bath we see her climbing out of in the opening scenes — bruised, battered, bloody and still somehow entirely collected. Her performance is light on dialogue, in contrast to the ninety-to-the-dozen chatter of James McAvoy’s David Percival (played with a combination of boyish charm, brutal self-interest, and sincerely dangerous competence): instead, her character is given definition through body-language. The physicality of Theron’s performance is intense, at times almost feral, in a way that fits seamlessly with the really good fight choreography.

(The fight choreography is really good: utterly brutal, unforgiving, full of found objects and with occasional appropriate punch-drunk stumbling. It’s visceral in a way that fight choreography seldom manages.)

Atomic Blonde is a spy film in which most of the characters seem to end up dead of Being A Spy.

It also portrays a queer relationship.

Theron’s Broughton is approached by French agent Delphine (Sofia Boutella), a younger and rather more innocent spy. Broughton is enthusiastically into it. (An aside: I didn’t know I wanted to see something like this until I did, and I didn’t know Atomic Blonde had a queer relationship in it until I saw it. A queer relationship! Treated just like a straight one! Not marked out in any way, not a giant part of the plot as in Carol or The Handmaiden, just spies being spies in bed.) This relationship is the only place where we see a hint of something that could be considered softness in Broughton, the only place where she’s a little less than perfectly guarded. It seems that she does actually feel something for Delphine — enough, at least, to tell her to get out of Berlin rather than killing her when Broughton thinks that Delphine has double-crossed her.

Of course, Bury Your Gays is a thing. So I knew Delphine was doomed from the moment she and Broughton kissed. And hey, what do you know? I was right. It’s a film that buries its gays, and I don’t want to say, “But at least it has them” (but at least it has them), although having them at all is unusual for a spy film.

But it’s 2017. I wanted to at least to be able to hope for Delphine to walk off alive by the time the credits rolled. I want there to be enough films where that happens that Queer Death becomes unpredictable. Not, “Oh, she’s doomed now, right?” “Oh, maybe NOT DOOMED JUST YET — nope, that was a fakeout. Doomed.” “Sigh.”

The strangulation scene, when Delphine very nearly fights off her murderer, is so annoying wrong. Hollywood has this tendency to show both CPR and garrotting to be very effective within a short timeframe. In reality, if you are going to choke someone to death, even if you crush their windpipe, it’s going to take a while. Even if it is restriction of bloodflow rather than oxygen that’s the root cause. And they’re going to be unconscious for a few minutes first. Like, three-six minutes. This is why, in sport martial arts, you can actually choke someone out without killing them. Their eyes don’t just roll up and go straight to dead!

I knew better than to expect Atomic Blonde to subvert the Buried Gays/Dead Girlfriend tropes, but seriously, GIRL AIN’T DEAD YET USE A BULLET. Bullets are harder to argue with: the part of me that knows how strangulation works kept expecting her to show up later, at odds with the part of me that knows how Hollywood works.

Atomic Blonde is a good film. I’m going to go see it again. It works well. (And it has a really great soundtrack).

But, you know. Fuck the Bury Your Gays trope. It’s boring and predictable and tedious and bad storytelling. Atomic Blonde would have been a better film without it.

 


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10 thoughts on ““You look different when you tell the truth. Your eyes change.” ATOMIC BLONDE (2017) – Patreon

  1. Haven’t seen the film — but in defense of Delphine being killed, remember that James Bond’s girlfriends usually end up dead too. So it’s more of a Dead Girlfriend trope than a Bury Your Gays trope.

    And yes, that instant-suffocation thing always annoys me as well!

  2. Sure. But I’m a big fan of Occam’s Razor — the simplest explanation is likely to be the correct one. And we know that Dead Girlfriend is a very common spy/action movie trope, so I see no need in this case to impute any additional, anti-LGBT motive to the filmmakers.

  3. You did. “It’s a film that buries its gays,” and “But, you know. Fuck the Bury Your Gays trope. It’s boring and predictable and tedious and bad storytelling. ”

    The filmmakers may have chosen to kill her off because she’s lesbian, or because she’s the spy’s girlfriend. Those imply two different motives. It’s like the difference between killing a Star Trek actor off because he’s Asian, or because he’s a redshirt — if he’s killed off because he’s Asian, it’s racism; but if he’s killed off because he’s wearing a red uniform, it’s merely a predictable storytelling crutch.

    It’s still boring and predictable if you see it as simply a Dead Girlfriend trope, but without the anti-LGBT overtones.

  4. Logic: not every member of an oppressed minority who dies on screen (or on page) is killed off as the result of some sort of discriminatory trope. Sometimes people just die; and sometimes they die because of some other, non-discriminatory trope.

    It’s unfair to saddle authors or filmmakers with accusations of discrimination (or of using discriminatory tropes) just because a minority member happens to end up not having a long and healthy life. And making unfounded accusations is somewhat like crying “Wolf!” — the more often unjustified accusations get made, the less attention people will pay when we make a justified one.

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