Sleeps With Monsters: Peculiar Heroines

A new column over at Tor.com, that I am behind in telling you about:

 

At this time of year, perhaps we should talk about award lists and award winners—but really, I’d rather talk about the entertaining stuff that hasn’t made it onto the award lists. Like Sarah Kuhn’s Heroine Complex and its sequel, Heroine Worship. I missed Heroine Complex when it came out last year, but I’m glad to have been able to catch up on these two unique entries in the superhero(ine) subgenre. Well, unique as far as I can tell: there aren’t that many superhero stories that star Asian-American women and mix soap opera, action, and comedy.

THE HALF-DROWNED KING by Linnea Hartsuyker

Reviewed over at Tor.com:

The Half-Drowned King is historical fiction, set in Norway during the early years—and early campaigns—of Harald Fair-hair, whom later history remembers as the first king of Norway. (Much of Harald’s life and reign is contested historical territory: there are no contemporary or near-contemporary accounts of his life.) Hartsuyker chooses not to focus on Harald himself, but instead on two siblings from a coastal farm, Ragnvald Eysteinsson and his sister Svanhild.

ARABELLA AND THE BATTLE OF VENUS by David D. Levine

Reviewed over at Tor.com:

Arabella and the Battle of Venus leaves me feeling rather bombarded by the way it foregrounds its particular racisms without ever really showing the world from marginalised people’s points of view. For some people, this won’t be a barrier to their enjoyment of the novel. For me, it took all the joy out of reading about airships in space. As far as I’m concerned, Robyn Bennis’ The Guns Above does airships, capers, and 19th-century-esque warfare much better.

 

LUNA: WOLF MOON by Ian McDonald

Reviewed over at Strange Horizons:

In some ways, Wolf Moon feels more like a sprawling family saga than the tightly intricate political/corporate/criminal thriller that was New Moon. Here there is no instigating event, like the assassination attempt in New Moon, that unfolds into an escalating series of crises. Rather, Wolf Moon deals with disintegration and with consequences: the disintegration first of the Corta family and the consequences of their fall from power, the disintegration of the Mackenzie family into warring factions, after an act of malice destroys their main family holding just like they destroyed the Cortas’ family seat, and the disintegration of all the old norms and certainties on the moon.

 

My Worldcon75 schedule

Non-binary Representation in Fiction

Thursday 11:00 – 12:00, 101c (Messukeskus)

Non-binary characters have begun to appear more frequently in both literature and media, such as Steven Universe, Eth’s Skin, and Lidia Yuknavitch’s Book of Joan. The panel discusses the good and the bad non-binary representation in recent and not so recent fiction.

Nick Hubble (M), Emma Humphries, D Franklin, Nino Cipri, Liz Bourke.

Reviewing 101

Thursday 16:00 – 17:00, 102 (Messukeskus)

So you want to review books, movies, games, anything? Come here the experienced reviewers tell about how to get started with reviewing, whether in a blog, Youtube, podcast or anything!

Juan Sanmiguel, Soikkeli , Liz Bourke (M), John Clute, Fred Lerner

Storytelling in Dragon Age and Mass Effect

Sunday 16:00 – 17:00, 205 (Messukeskus)

Dragon Age- and Mass Effect-gameseries have memorable characters, relationships and epic world saving quests. Panelists discuss what kind of stories they tell, what benefits there are for playing them in multiple times, what kind of romances and other emotional experiences they offer and why scifi and fantasy fans should play them.

Liz Bourke, Evil Ivo, Tanja Sihvonen (M).

Sleeps With Monsters: Stolen Tomatoes and Undead Deer

A new column over at Tor.com:

Ursula Vernon’s writing is filled with compassion, weird shit, and sharply observed humour: in some ways, much of her short fiction and most of her novels as T.K. Kingfisher is reminiscent of Terry Pratchett at his best. (One could call her an American, feminist Terry Pratchett — but that would do her a disservice: Vernon is very much her own unique self as a writer and an artist.)

SLEEPING WITH MONSTERS: Learning to Read Critically

Over at Tor.com, I have a post up about my Sleeping With Monsters: Readings and Reactions in Science Fiction collection, “Learning to Read Critically:”

Learning to read critically is an interesting process. You find you can’t turn it off unless you try really hard: you’re always paying attention to what kind of work the narrative is doing, and what sort of thing it’s setting itself up to be. You learn to recognise what particular works are interested in, and the shape of the story they’re telling. In many cases, you can tell what sort of book any given volume’s going to be—good, bad, indifferent, actively offensive; whodunnit or military-focused or romance or thriller or coming of age—within the first few pages.

 

Sleeping With Monsters is available now in paperback and electronic versions from Aqueduct Press. You can buy it there or from:

The Book Depository

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

And more places as I become aware of them. (There’s no listing on Barnes and Noble yet, or on Chapters for Canada.)

So far, Aqueduct Press is the only place where the ebook edition is available. But I’m pretty sure that’ll change.

Sleeps With Monsters: Older Women and TOMORROW’S KIN

A new column over at Tor.com:

Science fiction is rarely great at depicting older women: it seldom does, and when it does, rarely does it seem interested in them as women—with grown children, family issues, rich inner lives, friends and relationships both platonic and sexual—as opposed to ciphers. When I find a book that does depict an older woman well, and moreover puts her in a central role, in the narrative forefront—well, that’s a special occasion.